Hungry Shark Evolution

Hungry Shark Evolution

Hungry Shark Evolution


Game: Hungry Shark Evolution
Latest Version Played: 5.9.6
Developer: Ubisoft’s Future Games of London
Game Web Site: http://www.futuregamesoflondon.com/game/hungry-shark-evolution/


Controller/FireTV CompatibleTouchscreen/Fire Tablet Compatible


First released in 2012, the idea behind Hungry Shark Evolution is pretty simple: you’re a shark, you eat everything you can to keep from starving while leveling up to get stronger.  The more you play, the stronger you can make your shark, and as you play you can unlock stronger sharks.  The game is free to play.  You can spend money to unlock sharks and upgrades, but you never need to spend money to have fun.

There are 10 normal sharks, 5 special sharks, and over 15 baby shark pets which help you consume food, not to mention a ton of items that help in different ways.  There is a shipwreck of the Titanic that you can go to every 12 hours and a portal that transports you to a alien world with different fish and the alien shark which you can get as a shark once you unlock Mr.Snappy the mosasaurus.

Notes:

Future Game of London continues to update this game regularly, with the most recent update coming July 2018.

Fire Hardware Compatibility:

The game plays fine on all generations of the Fire TV platform.  It requires Android 4.1 or newer, so should be compatible with Fire tablets from the 2013 generation forward.

Controls:

I have played this game with a game controller on my Fire TV and on touchscreen on my 2016 Fire HD 8.  The game works well both ways, but it seems like the touchscreen controls are the way that it’s designed to be played and the game is better with touchscreen.  If you haven’t played touchscreen, you probably won’t miss it.

Original Article

My goal with this site is generally NOT to talk about a bunch of “mobile” games.  I mean, I’ve been sucked into a number of these games where the play session and advancement is determined by clocks and calendars and/or willingness to spend cash rather than effort and skill.  After a while you end up feeling like you either have to log in every 4 hours or you have to stop playing, because the model otherwise demands huge amounts of cash for play sessions.

There is a second model that is slightly different.  In this model is you play to unlock upgrades and you can bypass the play by paying.  Often the curve for the upgrades is too steep and it makes the upgrades impossible if you’re not spending money on in-game currency.

Often the games will additionally add advertising as a trade against in game currency or time.

It’s sometimes hard to draw a clear line, I don’t like the free-to-play, micro-transaction model in general, but I understand why it exists.  In mobile gaming I’ve rarely been happy when I’ve spent $10 on a game unless it’s something I KNOW I’m going to love before I buy it, so I am pretty hesitant to put down cash.

That brings us to games like this one.  It falls into the “upgrade” category with some advertising.  That said, it seems to be pretty well balanced.  My son (9 when this article was first written) and his friends have gotten hours and hours of enjoyment from this game without spending a dime.

Suggestions?  Corrections?  Updates?

Discuss this article in the forums.


Amazon Links

Amazon Download (free, microtransactions)
My Amazon Review


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